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celpip philippines

Speak Smart for CELPIP: Drop “Very” and Use These Words Instead! (A–D)


The word “very” is used to stress the extremity of an adjective or adverb. And, while there’s nothing wrong with using it, it’s still better to use single-word adjectives that convey the same message. Why? Because it demonstrates better language proficiency. It shows that you have an extensive vocabulary and you know when and how to use it. So, refrain from using “very” to emphasize your point.

Below is a list of adjectives that you can use instead of inserting “very” before an adjective or adverb. Practice using during your CELPIP Philippines review course.

 

  What to use instead of “very” Examples
very afraid fearful, frightened, alarmed He is very afraid of ghosts.

He is frightened of ghosts.

very angry furious, enraged, incensed She was very angry at the blatant injustice.

She was furious at the blatant injustice.

very annoying exasperating, aggravating They all found his jokes very annoying.

They all found his jokes exasperating.

very bad awful, appalling, terrible I was very bad at math.

I was terrible at math.

very beautiful gorgeous, attractive She was very beautiful that night.

She was gorgeous that night.

very big colossal, gigantic You didn’t tell me that your house was very big.

You didn’t tell me that your house was gigantic.

very boring dull, monotonous It was a very boring afternoon.

It was a dull afternoon.

very bright luminous, incandescent The lanterns were very bright, effortlessly lighting up the dark streets.

The lanterns were luminous, effortlessly lighting up the dark streets.

very busy swamped, buried Come back later when we’re not very busy with projects.

Come back later when we’re not swamped with projects.

very calm serene, composed, tranquil Surprisingly, she was very calm throughout the whole ordeal.

Surprisingly, she was composed throughout the whole ordeal.

very careful cautious, vigilant, wary They’re looking for you, so be very careful.

They’re looking for you, so be cautious.

very cheap stingy, frugal, thrifty People know her as a very cheap spender.

People know her as a stingy spender.

very clear obvious, evident He made his intentions very clear.

He made his intentions evident.

very cold freezing, frigid, frosty, chilly The waters are very cold this time of year.

The waters are frigid this time of year.

very colorful vibrant She loved wearing very colorful jewelry.

She loved wearing vibrant jewelry.

very competitive aggressive, cutthroat The business industry is very competitive.

The business industry is cutthroat.

very complete comprehensive, all-inclusive His lecture about global warming was very complete.

His lecture about global warming was comprehensive.

very confused perplexed, bewildered If it weren’t for her classes at the CELPIP Philippines review center, that question would have left her very confused.

If it weren’t for her classes at the CELPIP Philippines review center, that question would have bewildered her.

very crowded bustling The market was always very crowded.

The market was always bustling.

very dangerous perilous, treacherous That road is very dangerous at night.

That road is treacherous at night.

very dear cherished, adored She was very dear to him.

He cherished her.

very deep profound, intellectual Her words are few but very deep.

Her words are few but profound.

very depressed despondent, dejected The news left her feeling very depressed.

The news left her feeling despondent.

very detailed meticulous, fastidious His paintings are very detailed.

His paintings are meticulous.

 

Demonstrate your linguistic proficiency with refined word choice. Use concise adjectives and limit your use of the word “very.” Prepare with excellent CELPIP packages to learn more ways to enhance your speech and writings.